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My top 5 Egyptology songs

Egyptology is a serious academic discipline. Institutes across the globe are involved in research into this most wonderful of ancient cultures, looking at everything from pottery to temple architecture to the finer points of the language’s grammar.However, that doesn’t mean that we can’t have a bit of fun with it, as well. Fascination with the ancient Egyptians has spilled over into popular culture for a long time now. The decipherment of hieroglyphs in the 1820s and the discovery of Tutankhamun in the 1920s spawned all manner of Egyptomania, for instance.

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Press release: Sean Mee, ‘The Rameses Pact’

Sean Mee’s thriller, The Rameses Pact, was released in September 2013, and centres on the character Tristan Wylde, adventurer and academic, as he races to save the modern world from an ancient mystery.

Sean’s very kindly sent me the press release with more details of the book, so I thought I’d share it here with you.

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Sekhmet at the World Museum

When you first come into the World Museum in Liverpool, you find yourself in a large, airy foyer with some of the museum’s biggest items on display. This includes an unnervingly large spider-crab shell and a pterodactyl suspended from the ceiling. Here, flanking the entry to the main staircase is a pair of gorgeous Sekhmet statues. Although I was already a little familiar with the ancient Egyptian lioness, I wanted to know more. Who was this enigmatic goddess, seemingly so serene and regal-looking? And what role did she play for the ancient Egyptians? Well, here’s the low-down …

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Belzoni’s watercolours of Seti I’s tomb at the Bristol Museum

Born in Padua, Italy, in 1778, Giovanni Battista Belzoni led a colourful life. He studied hydraulic engineering in Rome when he was young, but then moved to the Netherlands and worked as a barber. He subsequently joined a circus in England, performing as a strongman, where he’d carry up to 12 people at a time across the circus floor (he stood in at 6′ 7″; impressive, even by today’s standards). An obvious career path, wouldn’t you agree!

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Book review: ‘Imhotep’ by Jerry Dubs

I’ve read my fair share of historical novels over the years, and a good number of these have been set in ancient Egypt. However, I hadn’t yet ventured very far into the world of self-published novels, so when a friend recommended Jerry Dubs’ Imhotep to me, I popped along to Amazon to check it out. Of course, one of the risks you take when buying self-published work is that you don’t know what you’re going to get: will the book be littered with typos and poorly constructed prose? Will the characters be well developed and believable, or will you be slapped in the face with the ramblings of someone who just hasn’t got what it takes to spin a good yarn?

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Who was Tetisheri?

Many years ago, I picked up a copy of a game called ‘Pharaoh’. It was a PC game based on strategic city building that enjoyed a great surge of popularity in the late nineties and early noughties (and still has a few dedicated disciples to this day).

You were given a choice of ancient Egyptian names to use for your character; I immediately fell in love with the name Tetisheri and spent many happy hours playing the game using this name.

I then started using Tetisheri as a username for online forums, games and, more recently, social networking, making her my firmly established online identity. When I put together my website, there was no way I could leave her behind. I’d done a little research into the real Tetisheri in the past, but I’ve decided it’s time to really bring her back to life. So, here she is.

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